Benefits

Sonic Benefits 

The TubeTrap is designed to absorb sound energy when in the presence of bass range sound pressure.  The higher the pressure, the more energy is absorbed. Bass pressure is 4 to 8 times stronger in the corners of the room than away from the corners.  TubeTraps are usually stacked floor-to-ceiling in columns in all four corners of the typical audio room. Each corner acts like a giant megaphone in reverse, compressing incoming sound waves into the narrow volume at the root of each corner of the room. This corner compression of bass waves creates the perfect location for a pressure zone bass trap: the TubeTrap.

 

Benefits

The TubeTrap is designed to absorb sound energy when in the presence of bass range sound pressure.  The higher the pressure, the more energy is absorbed. Bass pressure is 4 to 8 times stronger in the corners of the room than away from the corners. TubeTraps are usually stacked floor-to-ceiling in columns in all four corners of the typical audio room. Each corner acts like a giant megaphone in reverse, compressing incoming sound waves into the narrow volume at the root of each corner of the room. This corner compression of bass waves creates the perfect location for a pressure zone bass trap: the TubeTrap.

Not only do corners compress bass waves into pure pressure zones, but standing waves and room modes also fully compress into the corners. Corner loaded pressure zone bass traps, TubeTraps, are extremely efficient at controlling bass throughout the whole room by extracting energy out of the corners of the room.

Sound is stored in the volume of the room and absorbed on the surfaces of the room. The bass range is best absorbed in the corners of the room. Small rooms have a fairly large percentage of their room volume tied up in the 8 high-pressure zones (the corners), so bass buildup is inevitable with the use of high-power systems, and space is at a premium for sound absorption. Corner loaded pressure zone bass traps are perfectly suited to efficiently reduce bass energy buildup  in small audio playback rooms: the TubeTrap.

Seasoned listeners, from professional recording engineers and studio musicians, to passionate audiophiles and cinemaphiles, all agree about one important aspect of listening.  For the most part, listeners are not listening to their sound system being played in their room, but are actually listening to their room as it is being played by the sound system.  In audio playback, the room is the instrument and the sound system is the musician who plays the instrument.

It is very true that most people cannot imagine such a situation because, until we learn better, our eyes deceive our hearing. Our ears always tell us the true story but our eyes clearly see the loudspeakers and the source of the sound is clearly (visually) the loudspeakers. Our sight overrides our ear's perception of the sound and convinces us that we are hearing the loudspeakers. And if we are quite close to the loudspeakers, this perception is absolutely true. But set back in the traditional audiophile listening position, we are too far away from the speaker to clearly hear them. It is the room filled with sound that we are actually listening to.

The efforts expended in adding acoustical treatment to a room are intended to quiet the overpowering reflective voice of the room so we can better acoustically listen to our high quality loudspeakers. A very odd thing happens as the room acoustic is quieted down, the loudspeakers actually disappear and the sonic impression of where the sound is coming from occurs on an invisible sonic stage that spreads the width of the room and even wraps around the listener. It is much deeper that the distance the speakers are located off the front wall. Not only is there a lateral expanse to the sound stage but a depth as well. In a great sounding room, even the best speaker falls silent, and becomes the sculpture of the ever changing sound stage. But, enough of what the end of the trail looks like for now; let's look into what the humble beginning of this same trail looks like.

The performance of rooms that have been treated with even just a few TubeTraps is always improved.  But the description of the improved performance at first seems to defy logic, and it certainly defies one's initial expectations.  From the audiophile's perspective, a number of expected results are amply realized. Adding TubeTraps into the corners of the room does seem to smooth out the bass response.  It removes bass boom.  The bass becomes more dynamic, more lively and musical, compared to its formerly sluggish nature.  The bass extension down into the first octave is readily noticed, as it picks up more bottom end.  And this is what one expects to hear when the bass response in the room is better controlled.

However, another whole range of improvements are also accounted for: improvements in the treble range that are not particularly sensitive to the position of the inset treble diffusion panels.  These improvements in the treble performance belong to the improvement in the bass performance.  Because the bass sound levels cannot build up, the bass levels are more normalized to the rest of the musical spectrum.  Formerly hidden details in the treble range are being revealed as the bass buildup becomes controlled.  Along with this comes the impression of increased musicality and imaging.  Additionally, the listening space seems to take the character of a fantasy space, something much larger and spacious than the small dimensions of the physical listening room would normally provide.

And so we have learned that there is a lot of sound masking going on in loud, small listening rooms. As the room is quieted down, the sound masking effects are reduced and more subtle musical and imaging information becomes audible. Curiously, adding treble range sound panels and diffusers alone does not clear up these masking problems because these masking problems are caused by excessive bass buildup, and only bass traps can address this aspect of small room acoustics.

The performance of rooms that have been treated with even just a few TubeTraps is always improved.  But the description of the improved performance at first seems to defy logic, and it certainly defies one's initial expectations.  From the audiophile's perspective, a number of expected results are amply realized. Adding TubeTraps into the corners of the room does seem to smooth out the bass response.  It removes bass boom.  The bass becomes more dynamic, more lively and musical, compared to its formerly sluggish nature.  The bass extension down into the first octave is readily noticed, as it picks up more bottom end.  And this is what one expects to hear when the bass response in the room is better controlled.

However, another whole range of improvements are also accounted for: improvements in the treble range that are not particularly sensitive to the position of the inset treble diffusion panels.  These improvements in the treble performance belong to the improvement in the bass performance.  Because the bass sound levels cannot build up, the bass levels are more normalized to the rest of the musical spectrum.  Formerly hidden details in the treble range are being revealed as the bass buildup becomes controlled.  Along with this comes the impression of increased musicality and imaging.  Additionally, the listening space seems to take the character of a fantasy space, something much larger and spacious than the small dimensions of the physical listening room would normally provide.

And so we have learned that there is a lot of sound masking going on in loud, small listening rooms. As the room is quieted down, the sound masking effects are reduced and more subtle musical and imaging information becomes audible. Curiously, adding treble range sound panels and diffusers alone does not clear up these masking problems because these masking problems are caused by excessive bass buildup, and only bass traps can address this aspect of small room acoustics.